Salman Khalid

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Full Name
Salman Khalid
Gender
Province
City
Marital Status
Level Of Education
Co-curricular Activities
Occupation
Occupation Type
Years Of Experience
10
Distinction/certification
Second position in the university in M.phil with 3.83 CGPA
UN certified in training for youth with disability as a result of attending study programs in South Korea
Multiple certifications in the areas such as accessible technology, disability advocacy and right to information awareness campaign etc.
Job Details
Teaching English to intermediate and graduation students.
Managing various affairs related to the visually impaired students
Representing special education department in various meetings/seminars
Challenges
Communication with the deaf students
Managing bio metrical attendance
Biographical Profile
People associate blindness with darkness; I converted this darkness into a glowing opportunity to inspire many individuals around. I, therefore, would title the story of my life as "glowing darkness"!
Glowing darkness is not just a life story of a person with visual impairment; it actually is a dramatic journey from the valley of light to the gloomy forest, from the peak of brightness to the depths of darkness, and eventually getting its way back to the destination full of illumination.
To put it differently, it can be called an account of striking experiences covering varieties of life colours and unexpected outcomes, including the shock of childhood, the smacking of fate, the shattering of dreams, the snatching of hope, the collapsing of an ambition, followed by the restoration of strength, recapturing of courage, regaining of braveness and more importantly the return of the self-assurance!
I was born with no signs of physical deficiency and began growing up as a normal child. My childhood was filled with countless mischievous occurrences as I was one heck of a kid to be controlled! There is series of naughty stories and smiling memories connected to my early life. However, when I was 13, my life met with an unexpected incident that pushed a little jumping boy to the world of a dark cage. It was the time when I smelled the end of everything for myself and felt overly dismayed. Yes, the sudden blindness as a result of a head injury was an undesired reality that left me and my family in a state of a grand shock and trauma. This was extremely challenging phase of my life, the phase I never ever imagined to undergo, a tragedy that I was never ready for, and a jolting blow which I never thought to experience.
But life always has to move on, and soon after the close of one door, multiple others open up if you stay patient and hold a firm consecration.
After wasting couple of years in the treatment of my sight, I was happy to resume my education in a school for blind, but at the same time it was immensely tough to get myself adjusted in that new pattern and totally different mode of education.
I would give a huge credit to Aziz Jehan Begum Trust, a wonderful school for the blind that helped me enormously in converting the obstacles of my life into an inspirational story.
I was the first blind student to have opted for computer science for my intermediate in GC university Lahore and gracefully accomplished my graduation as well as masters in English literature from the same illustrious institution. Later on, GC university appointed me as an in-charge person of disability services centre to assist the visually impaired students in the campus. This was for the first time in Pakistan that a mainstream university of the highest stature established a facilities oriented centre to enable the VI students to manage their studies independently and I feel proud to have served there for more than seven years.
I was deeply fortunate to get selected twice by UN training programs on the theme of (global challenges of youth with disability) conducted in South Korea. It is always a matter of great honour for me to remain engaged with different organisations in the projects pertaining to the amelioration of visually impaired in Pakistan.